Last edited by Arashigar
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

1 edition of Plant responses to salinity found in the catalog.

Plant responses to salinity

an indexed bibliography

  • 37 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Office of the Regional Administrator for Agricultural Research (Western Region), Science and Education Administration, U.S. Department of Agriculture in Berkeley, Calif .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Plants,
  • Physiological effect,
  • Effect of salts on,
  • Salinity

  • Edition Notes

    Includes indexes.

    Statementeditors: L. E. Francois and E. V. Maas ; computer services: Hilary Burton and Marian Sullivan ; technical staff: Linda Sarnoff and Catherine Jackson. --
    SeriesUnited States. Dept. of Agriculture. Science and Education Administration. Western Region. Office of the Regional Administrator for Federal Research. Agricultural reviews and manuals. ARM-W ; no. 6
    The Physical Object
    Pagination361 leaves in various foliations ;
    Number of Pages361
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26349260M
    OCLC/WorldCa4762319

    Plant responses to salinity stress are reviewed with emphasis on molecular mechanisms of signal transduction and on the physiological consequences of altered gene expression that affect biochemical reactions downstream of stress sensing. We make extensive use of comparisons with model organisms, halophytic plants, and yeast, which provide a paradigm for many responses to salinity exhibited by. Salinity is a major constraint limiting agricultural crop productivity in the world. However, plant species and cultivars differ greatly in their response to salinity. This study was conducted in a greenhouse to determine the response of 4 commercial tomato rootstocks, 21 cultivars and 8 candidate varieties to salinity stress. Seeds were germinated in peat and when the plants were at the.

    cal approach to improving plant response to abiotic stresses. This book is not intended to cover all known abiotic stresses or every possible technique used to understand plant tolerance but instead to describe some of the widely used ap‐ proaches to addressing such major abiotic stresses as drought, salinity, extreme tempera‐. This paper discusses whole-plant responses to salinity in order to answer the question of what process limits growth of non-halophytes in saline soils. Leaf growth is more sensitive to salinity than root growth, so we focus on the process or processes that might limit leaf expansion. Effects of short-term exposure (days) are considered separately from long-term exposure (weeks to years). The.

    drought, salinity, heavy metals and radiation which. all have detrimental effects on plant growth and yield. However, certain plant species and ecotypes have. developed various mechanisms to adapt to such. stress conditions. Recent advances in the understanding of these abiotic. stress responses provided the impetus for compiling. Plant responses to salinity stress are reviewed with emphasis on molecular mechanisms of signal transduction and on the physiological consequences of altered gene expression that affect biochemical reactions downstream of stress sensing. We make extensive use of comparisons with model organisms, halophytic plants and yeast, which provide a paradigm for many responses to salinity exhibited by.


Share this book
You might also like
Iowa Baseball Confederacy

Iowa Baseball Confederacy

Response to crop-tree release

Response to crop-tree release

Cultivating a respectful and modest demeanour: children of the Foundling, 1800-1926

Cultivating a respectful and modest demeanour: children of the Foundling, 1800-1926

Secret Wisdom

Secret Wisdom

Report of the Colonial students committee

Report of the Colonial students committee

Iris Murdoch; a bibliography.

Iris Murdoch; a bibliography.

The Barnett brood

The Barnett brood

Old brigs cargo

Old brigs cargo

The Years of the City

The Years of the City

Haemophilia

Haemophilia

[West Dock]

[West Dock]

Heavy weather

Heavy weather

Plant responses to salinity Download PDF EPUB FB2

A clue to how ABA production in roots may contribute to the salt stress response is provided by the fact that ABA interacts with H 2 O 2 in plant systemic responses to stresses. Salinity stress results in a significant accumulation of ROS in plant roots. A major source of these ROS is NADPH oxidase, a plasma-membrane-bound enzyme complex from the NOX family.

Cited by: 2. Purchase Plant Responses to Drought and Salinity stress, Volume 57 - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN This paper Plant responses to salinity book whole-plant responses to salinity in order to answer the question of what process limits growth of non-halophytes in saline Plant responses to salinity book.

Currently, very few books of plant. Plants have evolved several mechanisms to acclimatize to salinity. It is possible to distinguish three types of plant response or tolerance: a) the tolerance to osmotic stress, b) the Na + exclusion from leaf blades and c) tissue tolerance (R Munns & Tester, ).Cited by: Abstract.

Plant response to salinity and various constituent ions in the soil solution and irrigation waters varies widely among plant species. Salt tolerance data may be used to select crops with the highest potential for agronomic production with highly saline by: Through this 2-volume book series, we critically assess the potential venues for imparting salt stress tolerance to major crops in the post-genomic era.

Accordingly, perspectives on improving crop salinity tolerance by targeting the sensory, ion-transport and signaling mechanisms were presented in Volume 1.

Plant Responses to Drought and Salinity Stress Developments in a Post-Genomic Era. Edited by Ismail Turkan. Vol Pages () Download full volume. Previous volume.

Next volume. Actions for selected chapters. Select all / Deselect all. Book chapter Full text access Chapter This review deals with the adaptive mechanisms that plants can implement to cope with the challenge of salt stress. Plants tolerant to NaCl implement a series of adaptations to acclimate to salinity, including morphological, physiological and biochemical changes.

These changes include increases in the root/canopy ratio and in the chlorophyll content in addition to changes in the leaf anatomy. planet is challenged by soil salinity, mostly with high Na+ levels, which are referred to as sodic soils (Qadir et al., ). Although not in parallel with the severity of the problem, there has been credible scientific effort to understand plant responses to salt stress and ways to alleviate its effects on plants.

The review is focused on plant proteome response to salinity with respect to physiological aspects of plant salt stress response. The attention is paid to both osmotic and ionic effects of salinity stress on plants with respect to several protein functional groups.

Therefore, the role of individual proteins involved in signalling, changes in gene expression, protein biosynthesis and. Introduction. Plants respond in many ways to salinity and at a number of levels (Munns and Tester, ).For example, extensive investigations of salt stress responses using transcriptomics approaches have been described for rice (Walia et al.,; Kumari et al., ) and Lotus japonicus (Sanchez et al., b).Complementing these studies are detailed analyses of changes of the.

PDF | OnMiguel A. Botella and others published Plant Adaptive Responses to Salinity Stress | Find, read and cite all the research you need on ResearchGate. Soil salinity is a major abiotic stress, limiting plant growth and development worldwide. Plants grown under saline soil condition experiences a significant amount of high osmotic stress, ion toxicities and nutritional disorder, and these are responsible for poor soil physical condition as well as lead to reduced plant productivity.

Plants exhibit a number of responses under salt stress by Author: Mohammad Golam Kibria, Md. Anamul Hoque. This thematic volume describes developments in understanding of plant responses to drought and salinity in post-genomic and are evaluated by world wide- known experts. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App.

Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or. Plant responses to salinity and drought are often similar. For example, the first phase of salinity stress, the osmotic effect, is quite similar to that of drought stress.

Plant roots have effective mechanisms to sense low water potential that result either from an actual lack of water in the environment, due to low precipitation, or to the. We uncovered specific responses of tomato plants to combined salinity‐pathogen stress, which varied with salinity intensity and plant resistance genes.

Moreover, hormones, with their complex regulation and cross‐talk, were shown to play a key role in the adaptation of tomato plants to the combined stress. Book Group Author: NA: Abstract: Analytical solutions of plant response to salinity and moisture content are simple, rigorous, general, and widely applicable to many situations and cases.

Current treatment of yield and water uptake responses as a function of salinity is based solely on plant specific properties and ignores soil and climate. In this review we focus on photosynthetic behavior of overwintering evergreens with an emphasis on both the acclimative responses of photosynthesis to cold and the winter behavior of photosynthesis in conifers.

Photosynthetic acclimation is discussed in terms of the requirement for a balance between the energy absorbed through largely temperature-insensitive photochemical processes and the. Introduction. Salinity is a widespread environmental constraint affecting plant biomass production and agricultural productivity.

Given the growing agricultural water scarcity and increased area of salt-affected land, the ability of crop plants to tolerate high salt concentrations is now an agriculturally useful trait (Rus et al. ).A full understanding of the physiological and molecular. Engineering Practices for Management of Soil Salinity book.

Agricultural, Physiological, and Adaptive Approaches. and agronomic interventions as well as an understanding of plant response when exposed to these stresses. This volume explores and conveys the latest information on emerging technologies in the management of abiotic salt stress.

Soil salinity is a major environmental stress that restricts the growth and yield of crops. Understanding the physiological, metabolic, and biochemical responses of plants to salt stress and mining the salt tolerance-associated genetic resource in nature will be extremely important for us to cultivate salt-tolerant crops.

In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the mechanisms of.A halophyte is a salt-tolerant plant that grows in soil or waters of high salinity, coming into contact with saline water through its roots or by salt spray, such as in saline semi-deserts, mangrove swamps, marshes and sloughs and seashores.

The word derives from Ancient Greek ἅλας (halas) 'salt' and φυτόν (phyton) 'plant'. An example of a halophyte is the salt marsh grass Spartina. The ability of plants to respond to environmental stimuli is essential to plant survival.

Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone with roles at various stages of plant development. ABA also plays a major role in mediating physiological responses to environmental stresses such as salt, osmotic, and cold stress. Plant responses to environmental stress have been widely studied in the model plant.